Summer Reading Progress 2017

Total Books Read (since July 1st):: 6
10 Books of Summer Challenge:: 6/10 (see my book list here)
Classics Club Challenge:: 5/50     (see my book list here)

Since I didn’t finish too many books in July, I wanted to wait a little while longer to post an update. Now I’ve finished 6 novels since my last update in June, and I think that’s a good number.

The first book I finished in July was My Cousin Rachel by Daphne Du Maurier. This novel has become very popular in the last year or so because a movie adaptation was recently released which I have not seen. On the whole I am still not really sure what to think of it. It’s written in a way that kind of leaves certain plot points up for interpretation (which I’ve found I do not like very much!!). I read it as part of a book group read, and everyone else in the group seemed to interpret the events in a different way than I did (you can read more about it in my review here if you’re interested). I did enjoy it as I read because the writing is good, but after reading Rebecca I was just expecting a little bit more.

After that, I needed a little bit of a pallet cleanser, so I picked up a quick book called Mrs. Hemingway by Naomi Wood, my review of which is here. I have been a lover of Ernest Hemingway since I first read A Farewell to Arms as a 17 year old, and I love reading anything by or about him. Mrs. Hemingway outlines the overlaps, beginnings, and endings of Hem’s four marriages. Each are given an equal piece of the story, and I learned a lot about some of his later marriages that I had not been familiar with. It is fiction though, not a history book ;-)

After that I dug back into my 10 Books of Summer Challenge and read The Fireman by Joe Hill (Stephen King’s son, if you didn’t know). I don’t have a review of this up as of the time I am posting this (I am quite behind on writing them to be honest). I started this apocalyptic novel last summer after it had first come out and it fizzled out (by no fault of the story or writing), so I wanted to start it over and finish it this time. I really enjoyed it, and it had a lot of similarities to one of his dad’s most famous books, The Stand, especially in the beginning. It’s really long and it took me awhile to finish, but I felt satisfied at the end. There is nothing worse than investing a lot of time into a book that ends up being disappointing…

The next book I read was another short/palette cleanser type of novel called The Madwoman Upstairs. It’s a contemporary mystery/adventure story about the last Brontë descendant and a rumored secret Brontë inheritance. It was quick and entertaining, just as I was hoping for….because at the same time I was listening to…

Middlemarch, by George Eliot. Oh, my, goodness. I loved this novel, and I am working on a review. It was such a lovely story that surrounds several characters throughout the town of Middlemarch, many of which are youngsters who are looking for love and marriage. There are sooo many wholesome themes in this novel that I’m afraid I won’t do them justice even in my discussion of it in a dedicated post (that is bound to be about a million words), but what you should know about it is – you should read it! Yes, it’s super long, but it is worth it a thousand times (in my opinion). This is definitely one of my favorite books of the year!

And finally, just this week I finished reading Anne of Green Gables by LM Montgomery. This was such a joy to read as well, in quite a different way. It was written at the turn of the 20th century and follows a little orphan girl who is adopted by some older folks who take her in and raise her right. She is a spirited young girl who lives so much within her imagination and touches the lives of everyone around her. It’s a beautiful coming of age story that most people probably read when they were much younger than 28 (ha), but as an adult I still enjoyed it very much and I plan to continue the series.

Right now I am reading a book called The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro and Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke. The first of which I came across awhile ago and had to buy (I’m about halfway through at the moment and not entirely sure what to think of it), the second of which I just finished reading in January before my son was born and am reading again. I’m only a few chapters into it as a reread and already SO much is coming back to me about this incredible book. It is so complex and lovely…and I could probably read it again next year and enjoy it just as much again.

I am curious, all of you blog readers, which have been your favorite books this year? Leave a comment and let me know!

e.

 

June Reading Wrap Up

Hello friends – I hope your month of reading in June was as good as mine! I will just go ahead and admit right now that the last several years of my life have basically been one big reading slump, so the fact that I read 5 (FIVE) books in June makes me feel freaking awesome! So since I actually have something to talk about, I thought it would be appropriate to write a post summarizing my month in reading.

Total Books Read:: 5
10 Books of Summer Challenge:: 4/10    (see my book list here)
Classics Club Challenge:: 2/50     (see my book list here)

I started June with a mission: finish Gone With the Wind. I usually have issues finishing longer books, and I don’t know why. It’s so bad that I’ve been calling it a curse! The only way I’ve been able to get through doorstop books are by reading them either on an e-reader (The Stand, Stephen King), or as an audiobook (Game of Thrones books 2 & 3…and half of 4). Well, I am happy to say that the curse appears to have broken! I finished Gone With the Wind, my copy has 1,024 pages, in 25 days! I cannot adequately express how proud this makes me without making myself sound ridiculous, but ah who cares. I’m awesome!

However…

I still feel like I’m in a little bit of shock from it. It is not the book I was expecting…at all. To be fair, I didn’t really have any expectations about it going in, but I was expecting it to blow me away. After all, sooo many people say this is one of their favorite books ever. I’ve been keeping reading journals here on the blog after finishing each Part, but I am still gathering my thoughts on an actual full-book review. If you are interested in reading those, here are the links:   Part I   Part II   Part III   Part IV
I found the movie on Amazon Video, so I am planning to watch that and possibly blog about it as well.

I finished the rest of the four books I read this month on audio. The first was the only non-fiction book I read this month, The View from the Cheap Seats. I’ve already blogged my thoughts on this book here,  but I’ll say it again – I highly recommend it for anyone who loves Neil Gaiman, or anyone who is a fan of comics, or writers, or the science fiction genre, or literature in general.

Next I listened to a book called The Girl You Left Behind (my review is here). This book was recommended to me by a friend at work numerous times. I was on the fence about reading it since I didn’t love Me Before You, also by Jojo Moyes, but she finally convinced me. I was surprised at how dark it was, and ultimately I really enjoyed it. It had some issues, but overall it was very impactful, and I still think about it ocaasionally. Funny how some books just stick with you that way.

I also read A Study in Scarlet, the first Sherlock Holmes story by Arthur Conan Doyle (review will be up in the next few days). This was another book from my Classics Club challenge, and it was a super quick read. I can’t say either of the two Sherlock stories I’ve read so far engrossed me, but I did like this one.

And finally Lincoln in the Bardo. This audiobook has something like 166 narrators. It’s nuts. I’ve never listened to an audiobook production with a full cast, and in the beginning it was very off-putting (it’s quite a cacophony of voices at times), but you adjust to it quickly enough. I especially loved that I could pick out voices of some of my favorite people; Nick Offerman, Rainn Wilson, David Sedaris, Megan Mullally, and many other names I know, but didn’t recognize while immersed in the story. I am still working out what I might say about this book in a blog post, so it may be awhile until you find it here on my blog, but I kind of loved it.

Right now I am listening to one of my favorite books of all time on audio: Jane Eyre (narrated by Josephine Bailey, my preferred version), and reading My Cousin Rachel in paperback. I’m hoping to finish another 5 books in July, wish me luck!!

Update

…..I’m back!

It’s been a long time. A really long time. So long I actually forgot the name of my blog – it had to percolate in the depths of my brain for two whole days before it came back to me. And somehow, miraculously, I also remembered the username and password to log back in!

My last post was three years ago, which seems about right because over the last few years my reading has been anything but consistent. I think I even went an entire year without finishing even one new book. Once my reading habit started to fall off, I told myself I was done with trying to keep up the blog, and I think you can tell from the last few posts that I was trying to get myself back into it, I just couldn’t. I didn’t want the extra pressure of feeling like I HAVE to write about every book I read anymore. I was tired of being afraid of picking up an especially long book because that meant my posts wouldn’t be consistent enough to keep or gain followers, or rushing through a novel just so I could review it faster. If you let it all get to you, it can be really draining. In my case, it started to keep me from picking up a book at all.

I was glad for the break from blogging, but I feel refreshed now and ready to get back into it. Because the space from blogging also made me realize something: I love having it.

Because I had a whim to begin a book blog six or so years ago, I now have this incredible record of the books I’ve read and what my thoughts were on them at the time. It’s amazing what you forget about books you’ve read even after a short span of time. It’s also interesting to see how much I have changed over the course of keeping this blog. When I started I don’t think I even had my ‘professional’ office job yet, I certainly didn’t drive (I was a late bloomer there), and lived with roommates (who happened to by my now-husband, then boyfriend’s grandparents). Things have certainly changed! We now own a house, my first car is due for a breakdown at any minute, we’ll be celebrating our four-year wedding anniversary this year, and I’m a new mom! It will be wonderful to be able to reread one of those books and look at what I first thought of it and how my the reading experience changed with time.

From looking back I’ve also learned a few things about how I want to blog going forward. I’m not going to MAKE myself write about a book if I am just not feelin’ it. And I’m not going to make myself write about every book in the same way. Reading, for me at least, is very emotional and personal. Part of the beauty of a book is how it makes you think and feel afterwards. I like my reviews to reflect those feelings in my writing style sometimes. No, this isn’t a professional blog – it’s a personal one, and an informal one even on that spectrum. So I feel okay about not having  concrete style or schedule.

I’m sure that after all this time I have zero followers who may read this, but I wanted to write something to transition into blogging again. So like this post or leave a comment if you’re reading this, just so I know you’re there. Tell me what your favorite book is at the moment and why. I’ll start.

Of the books I’ve read so far this year, my favorite is the one I’m currently reading (as an audiobook): The View from the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman. It’s a collection of various non-fiction works of his. This book totally plays to my inner book nerd. I love the discussions on the importance of literacy, adult vs children’s books, and genre that I’ve read so far. Plus it’s narrated by Neil Gaiman, which is, objectively, the best.

See you again very soon,
E.

What I’m Reading | Fall 2014

Today is the official beginning of my favorite season, Autumn. As such, I thought it would be appropriate to let you guys know what is on my To-Read List for the next few months.

I’ve always felt that there are certain books that were meant to be read in the cooler months, which is what has inspired all of the books on this list (although I’m always open to impulsive reads too!).

My Cousin Rachel

The first ‘autumn’ read I’ve chosen is My Cousin Rachel, by Daphne DuMaurier. Last year I read Rebecca, and I loved it so much I wanted to reread it this year, until I found My Cousin Rachel at the bookstore last month (how did I not know this existed before?!). What I loved about Rebecca was the suspense, the mystery/plot twists, the writing style, and the gothic elements of the story, and so far I’ve not been disappointed by this book either. DuMaurier seems to have a thing for beginnings that make you beg for more, while maintaining stylistic perfection. I’m hooked, and I can’t wait to sit down with it this weekend and read as much as I can.

Dracula

I’ve also started Dracula, by Bram Stoker. I have to admit, I was not looking forward to reading this and simply chose it because it is ‘classic Halloween’, but even after only the first few pages, I knew my pre-conceived notions about this novel were dead wrong. This is a prime example of why you should not judge a book by its reputation! More about this to come in the ‘official’ review.

The Woman in White The Haunting of Hill House

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two other books I have on order and should be here this week: The Haunting of Hill House, by Shirley Jackson, and The Woman in White, by Wilkie Collins. I don’t know much about either of these books, but they both sound interesting and I think they’ll fit right into my autumn/spooky theme.

I’m hoping to finish these four novels before Halloween, so I’ve got a lot of reading ahead of me, but I’m up for the challenge!

In case you’re looking for some ideas for fall reading, here are some other seasonal favorites I’ve read in years past::

Rebecca, by Daphne DuMaurier

Rebecca, by Daphne DuMaurier

Out Stealing Horses

Out Stealing Horses, by Per Petterson

The Thirteenth Tale, by Diane Setterfield

The Thirteenth Tale, by Diane Setterfield

The Loch, by Steve Alten

The Loch, by Steve Alten

Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë

Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë

 

Thanks for reading,
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